Newsletter

CaSPA is very proud to announce the launching of the 2022 Scholarships and Awards. There will be two Scholarships for next year.

One will be for all principals as usual and the other will be specifically to promote women in leadership. 

The scholarship can be used to do online courses or parts of a Master’s Degree with ACU, Harvard (Australia) or another university.

The scholarship could also be used to arrange school visits or courses run by organisations such as NESLI. Due date for both Scholarship applications to the CaSPA Board is 30 October 2021.

The Awards are explained in the attached documents and are also available on the CaSPA website. The nominations from each State & Territory are due to CaSPA Board by 28 February 2022.

Please remember that all awardees to be eligible are expected to attend the 2022 Conference to receive their award in person.

Nomination Forms have been sent to all State and Territory Catholic Principal Associations and can be viewed at the following link on the CaSPA website: https://caspa.schoolzineplus.com/introduction

Healing Country:

Fr_Frank_Brennan.png

CaSPA joins with and unequivocally supports Fr Frank Brennan in his “Healing Country” message recently:

‘Today our world is in need of healing – environmentally, spiritually and socially.  We must all come together as a global community to fight the injustices of inequality, racism and environmental damage.’

Please read Fr Brennan’s full homily via this link: https://jesuit.org.au/fr-frank-brennan-sj-homily-for-aboriginal-and-torres-strait-islander-sunday/

Plenary Council 2020

Bishop_Vincent.png

CaSPA senses a spirit of great hope and optimism in the 2021 Helda Camara Lecture delivered by Bishop Vincent Long in which he outlined his hopes for the future Catholic Church in Australia.

“The model of the Church based on clerical hegemony has run its course. Insofar as it is deeply embedded in patriarchal and monarchical structures, it is incapable of helping us to meet the needs of the world and culture in which we live. We have long moved out of the Ancien Régime and the age of absolute monarchs. We are on this side of the secular state and the rise of democracy. Yet it seems that the deeply entrenched patriarchal and monarchical structures of the Church have failed to correspond with our lived experience.

For the Church to flourish, it is crucial that we come to terms with the flaws of clericalism and move beyond its patriarchal and monarchical matrix. What is urgent is that we need to find fresh ways of being Church and fresh ways of ministry and service for both men and women disciples. New wine into new wineskins! The new wine of God’s unconditional love, radical inclusivity and equality needs to be poured into new wineskins of humility, mutuality, compassion and powerlessness. The old wineskins of triumphalism, authoritarianism and supremacy, abetted by clerical power, superiority, and rigidity are breaking.”

The full transcript: https://catholicoutlook.org/bishop-vincent-my-hope-for-the-plenary-council/

In addition, there is a statement from Fr Frank Brennan in relation to the 2021 Helda Camara Lecture message about the future Catholic Church expressed by Bishop Long.

“Bishop Vincent Long fled his homeland on a fishing boat after the Vietnam War.  He ended up settling in Australia as a refugee. He’s been copping quite a deal of flak lately – the sort of flak reserved for outsiders who don’t quite belong in the royal sanctuary, the national temple.  Recently he delivered the Helder Camara Lecture at Newman College.  While others who lead our Church are urging that there is little need for change, and that in fact, change is antipathetic to the Roman tradition, Long declared:

Unless we genuinely repent of institutional failures and unless we convert to the radical vision of Christ and let it imbue our attitudes, actions and pastoral practices, we will not be able to restore confidence and trust in the Church.

“Until we have the courage to admit the old ways of being Church, which is steeped in a culture of clerical power, dominance and privilege, we cannot rise to a Christ-like way of humility, inclusivity, compassion and powerlessness.”

The full transcript: https://catholicoutlook.org/fr-franks-homily-11-july-2021/

SocialAction.V2.jpg

CaSPA Social Action 

CaSPA is pleased to announce that it will provide the opportunity for a member or an affiliated State / Territory Catholic Principals’ Association to be involved in Social Action. It is hoped that through involvement in this program the member or association will have the opportunity to engage in Social Action that may otherwise not take place. The Social Action gives witness to the tenant of the Catholic Church by supporting those who are in need or marginalised.

Pope Francis has asked many times during his Papacy to support and work with those at the margins: “Go forth and reach out to all people at the margins of society! Go there and be the Church, with the strength of the Holy Spirit.”

The rationale for the Social Action is that CaSPA and its Corporate Partners are aware of the difficulties individuals or groups face due to ethnicity, remoteness, financial hardship or gender. The project will enhance the Church’s social teaching and provide an opportunity for members to help others who are in need.

Applications need to be made to the local State or Territory Catholic Principal Associations.  A national decision will then be made to award one recipient with the CaSPA Social Action Funding.

The closing date for applications: 30 August 2021.  Funding for the Social Action will be funded through the funds provided by the generous CaSPA Partners.

Combined Meeting (CaSPA & State / Territory Associations) preparation: Now planned for 13 September 2021 in Adelaide.

Branding Meetings with CaSPA Partners: with Athas Concepts to enhance the partnership benefits.

Coalition of Australian Principals (CAP): Meeting regularly and focussed on Principal Wellbeing and COVID Issues

Working with NCEC and ACU: re teachers in Rural & Remote regions of Australia

Profiles of all the CaSPA Board are available on the CaSPA Website: https://caspa.schoolzineplus.com/current-and-past-board-members

New Platinum Corporate Partner approved: Australian Catholic Superannuation & Retirement Fund.

New Silver Corporate Partner approved: FujiFilm.

ACU & CaSPA Meeting: Discussion about Phil Riley Research and future post graduate courses for school leaders.

ITE Consultation with NCEC: Strategies to attract beginning teachers to Rural and remote areas.

Social Action Funding Launched & nominations due by 30 August

Finalising the organisation of Perth CaSPA Conference: 10 - 12 July 2022

Working with NCEC and ACU: re teachers in Rural & Remote regions of Australia

ACU_Header.jpg

Leading Through Uncertainty

This short course provides a unique framework to help you manage turbulence, leverage risk and make more informed decisions. It's made up of 4 modules, each 3.5 hours in duration so there's not a lot of time away from work. The learning is practical, rich and very relevant.

Each module is delivered by experts with extensive knowledge and significant experience. Update your knowledge and skills with these modules:

o   24 August: Module 1 - Systemic Practice for Navigating Uncertainty

o   25 August: Module 2 - Psychology of Risk

o   31 August: Module 3 - Caring for Self and for Staff

o   2 September: Module 4 - Humanistic Leadership.

PROMOTIONAL CODE  ‘CASPA’ to receive discounted course fee

https://www.acu.edu.au/ltuschools

CaSPA CONFERENCE 2022

Conference22.jpg
Joe_Corbo.png

Name: Joe Corbo

Current School: Gleeson College

Previous Position: Deputy Principal (Gleeson College)

First Year as a Principal: 2020

Year of Birth: 1961

My big picture for my current school is: A journey of the heart, an expedition of the mind.

The Joy of Principalship is: Taking care of those you are responsible for.

Favourite Book: “Dealing with meetings you can’t stand.” (Dr. R Brinkman)

Favourite Food: Mum’s Lasagna

Interests / Hobbies: Music, fishing and my Abarth 124 spider

My Favourite Well-Being Strategy: Top-down driving in the Adelaide hills and playing a musical instrument.

Advice for a Beginning Principal: Don’t start during a pandemic! …and care for those you are responsible for.

Favourite Leadership Quote: The value of a true leader is not measured by the work they do, but by the work they inspire others to do. (Simon Sinek)

What Title would you give to your TED Talk or Book:

“If you want to go quickly, go alone, if you want to go far, go together.”

Edna_Galvin.png
Name: Ms Edna A Galvin 

Current School: St. Monica’s College, Cairns

Previous Position: St. Patrick’s Senior College – APC, Mackay

First Year as a Principal: 2016

My big picture for my current school is: To continue to graduate strong, independent, well-educated and motivated young women

The Joy of Principalship is: Creating strong, independent, confident young people – plus running in to ex-students who are thriving

Favourite Book: The God of Small Things Arundhati Roy; Cloudstreet Tim Winton

Favourite Food: Italian

Interests / Hobbies: Reading; Drama/Theatre/Dance; Trivia; Travel (If able to again)

My Favourite Well-Being Strategy: Mindfulness; Humour; Exercise

Advice for a Beginning Principal: Have a good Companion Principal

Favourite Leadership Quote: Leadership is about service and responsibility – it is an action not a position. 

What Title would you give to your TED Talk or Book: Dazzle - Empowering Women Through Education

Catherine_Gurr.png

Name: Catherine Gurr

Current School: St Joseph’s School, Port Lincoln

Previous Position: Principal, Emmaus Catholic School - Woodcroft

First Year as a Principal: 2014

Year of Birth: A secret!

My big picture for my current school is: “Improving learning outcomes for all students, supporting staff and students to become the best possible version of themselves, building the sense of community and improving resources and facilities to make a great school even greater!”

The Joy of Principalship is: The satisfaction of making a difference to a student, a family, a staff member, a school community.

Favourite Book: ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ or ‘The Very Hungry Caterpillar’

Favourite Food: Char Kway Teow

Interests / Hobbies: Running and Cooking

My Favourite Well-Being Strategy: Running or walking on the beach

Advice for a Beginning Principal: Be yourself, be honest, be humble

Favourite Leadership Quote:

Screen_Shot_2021_07_29_at_10.58.25_am.png

 What Title would you give to your TED Talk or Book:

Becoming…….

Ann_Rebgetz.png

Dear Colleagues

My heartfelt gratitude and thanks to all the Principals and school staff for their care of families and students during the current challenging times around Australia. Your ongoing essential and loving work needs to be acknowledged and celebrated.

Since the last Board Meeting in earlier in July, CaSPA research has commenced discussions with the Australian Catholic University and PIVOT Research to investigate what CaSPA can do as a professional association to support Principals generally but also specifically in Rural and Remote areas.

It is with great excitement and pleasure that I announce the launching of the new CaSPA Newsletter format. My sincere thanks to Athas Concepts for their wonderful work in rebranding CaSPA’s communications.

It is also a great pleasure to announce the launching of the 2022 CaSPA Awards and Scholarships. Please see the link later in this newsletter or on the CaSPA website for further details.

Another key focus of the recent Board meeting was the important messages of hope related to NAIDOC Week and Plenary Council from Fr Frank Brennan and Bishop Vincent Long. Please take some time to read the reflections of hope referenced in this newsletter. CaSPA joins with and unequivocally supports Fr Frank Brennan in his “Healing Country” message. CaSPA also looks forward to meeting with Lana Turvey Collins (Plenary Council Facilitator) in August to discuss the Plenary Council processes and possible outcomes.

In closing, I would also express concern over the recent article published by Paul Kelly in “The Australian” on July 24th. Standardised testing such as NAPLAN, PISA and TIMMS only measure a very narrow spectrum of what schools do. We applaud the work of ACARA, AITSL and the newly formed Education Research Institute. There is much to be gained through the innovative work of these agencies and the ongoing collaboration DESE engages in with National Associations. Funding and investment in education is an investment in a productive economy – this is well documented and researched – innovation and enterprise are keys to our future. We need to strongly promote and collaborate to increase the status of teaching, not the reverse as suggested in the article! Covid has been a great example of the competence and standards of teachers, and school leadership, with their ability to steer the educational story through waves of challenge!

Blessings to all

Ann Rebgetz

CaSPA President

Acknowledgement_of_Country.jpg
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

SocialAction.V2.jpg

CaSPA Social Action 

CaSPA is pleased to announce that it will provide the opportunity for a member or an affiliated State / Territory Catholic Principals’ Association to be involved in Social Action. It is hoped that through involvement in this program the member or association will have the opportunity to engage in Social Action that may otherwise not take place. The Social Action gives witness to the tenant of the Catholic Church by supporting those who are in need or marginalised.

Pope Francis has asked many times during his Papacy to support and work with those at the margins: “Go forth and reach out to all people at the margins of society! Go there and be the Church, with the strength of the Holy Spirit.”

The rationale for the Social Action is that CaSPA and its Corporate Partners are aware of the difficulties individuals or groups face due to ethnicity, remoteness, financial hardship or gender. The project will enhance the Church’s social teaching and provide an opportunity for members to help others who are in need.

Applications need to be made to the local State or Territory Catholic Principal Associations.  A national decision will then be made to award one recipient with the CaSPA Social Action Funding.

The closing date for applications: 30 August 2021.  Funding for the Social Action will be funded through the funds provided by the generous CaSPA Partners.

A True Vocation: 67 Years on Bathurst Island

On Friday 18 June Sister Anne Gardiner OLSH turned 90 years of age. Sister Anne has spent 67 of those years serving the Bathurst Island Community and is currently the oldest person on the Island. In addition, on the 2 July Sister Anne will also celebrate 70 Years as a Daughter of the Our Lady of the Sacred Heart (OLSH).

Birthday celebrations for Sister Anne were held with friends arriving  from Darwin, Melville Island and Tiwi Islands. CaSPA extends its sincere congratulations to Sister Anne for her 90th Birthday, her faith filled commitment to her vocation and her amazing service to the Tiwi People.

MichaelLee3.png

CaSPA Director, Michael Lee, recently visited Bathurst Island at the time of Sister Anne’s birthday celebrations. Michael also at the same time visited fellow  CaSPA Director, Andree Rice, who is the Principal at Xavier College on Bathurst Island. Michael had a wonderful day meeting the staff and students at Xavier Catholic College as well as many community members.

Congratulations Sister Anne!

Profiles of all the CaSPA Board are available on the CaSPA Website: https://caspa.schoolzineplus.com/current-and-past-board-members

Proposed NAPLAN replacement would put student needs first: Report Author

By Geordie Little
Published June 10, 2021

A recent report by UNSW’s Gonski Institute for Education detailed the authors’ vision for a new national testing program to replace NAPLAN.

Under the proposal, the old testing regime would be replaced by an item bank and online library of formative assessment tasks called an Assessment Resource System (ARS), which teachers could draw on in class.

The ARS resources would be mapped to and closely aligned with the curriculum and benchmarked against national standards.
Crucially, the new testing regime would be sample-based, which would still allow for system-level monitoring of student performance, but not for direct school comparisons.

The authors arrived at their recommendations by reconsidering what the priorities of a national assessment program should be.
According to the report, four factors should be considered: What do students need from a national assessment program? What information do teachers and schools need to support students? What information do parents need to support their children and schools? And finally, what is the necessary minimum information that governments need for accountability purposes and to support all of the above?

“The biggest recommendation is we actually need to reorient the assessment towards the needs of students … [and then] the system requirements for monitoring and accountability as a lower priority,” University of Sydney Associate Professor and report author Rachel Wilson explained.

“And I say that not because I’m discounting them, but because their needs are actually relatively easy to meet, and I think we’re overdoing it on that front. We’re overdoing it with census testing. It’s unnecessary and brings lots of negative outcomes.”

Wilson told Australian Teacher Magazine that a shift towards formative assessment would better meet the needs of students.

“NAPLAN was not designed to promote learning, it was simply designed as a monitoring and accountability framework.

“Now, over the years, various people said, ‘Oh, the tests are diagnostic, oh, they’re formative’. Well, the contradictory messages there have done nothing but frustrate people who’ve had to work with NAPLAN in schools.

“I think it’s pretty clear after reviewing all the literature that NAPLAN is neither diagnostic nor formative, and indeed, various CEOs have at different times acknowledged and admitted that. So what we need to do now is build an assessment system which does focus on learning.”

Wilson said her proposal would also help correct a drift away from classroom-based assessment.

“Over the years as NAPLAN’s been implemented, I’ve observed, and I have some research data also supporting this, that teachers are doing less classroom-based assessment, less of the teacher-led stuff, because they’re working towards preparation for NAPLAN.

“Now, to focus on learning we need to correct that balance, and I think we have the capability to have a smart and sensitive classroom-based assessment system that teachers can tap into, which provides assurances on quality and also benchmarks students against national standards.”

The proposed national assessment program would adopt a wider lens than NAPLAN.

“Now, initially, it would be based on literacy and numeracy, because that’s what we have been focusing on. But we could also introduce assessments in science, ICT and civics, and we could grow that item bank to include all areas of the curriculum, including HSIE, geography, history, social sciences, all of the sciences, mathematics as opposed to numeracy, we could include creative arts,” Wilson said.

“So the idea is to have a test item bank that is nice and broad, that teachers can draw on when they cover various parts of the curriculum. The items would have to be assessed and evaluated for psychometrics of course, and their alignment to the curriculum … and they would also have a linking through to standards and benchmarks. So when the teachers draw on an online system to produce a test of their choosing, [using] their professional judgement on the appropriateness of the assessment for their students, they can use those items to provide something which, when reported to parents, will provide a really nice, full picture of the child and their achievements.”

The report identifies a host of issues with NAPLAN, which it describes as, at worst, “deeply problematic”, and, at best, a lost opportunity to strengthen schools and meet national education goals.

Wilson said that NAPLAN has become high stakes – not just for schools, but for students as well.

“There is a build up to it. Even if the test had no repercussions for them educationally, they are being sent messages that it is very important. Those messages are loud and clear in the test preparation that they do, probably in the tone of voice of their teacher every time they mention it, and that builds a sense of magnitude to the whole testing experience.

“And we must remember that we are asking Grade 3 students to sit these tests – Grade 3 kids are young. Now I have lived through enough educational eras to remember the discussions when, for example, most of Britain gave up the eleven-plus exam. At 11, they felt it was way, way too young for a high stakes assessment. And here we are, so many years later, and we’re asking eight- and nine-year-olds to sit a high stakes test.

“We might be confusing them, because on the one hand … parents say it doesn’t matter, but they’re confronted by the fact that the child’s been given so many other signals that it does matter, it creates all these contradictions and tensions.”

When asked by Australian Teacher Magazine whether education minister Alan Tudge had read the report or considered its recommendations, the Government provided no response.

Tudge did, however, release a public statement in which he said he “won’t be bowing to those who want to scrap NAPLAN”.
Wilson said the Government’s failure to acknowledge the report was disappointing.

“Look, it is a very big shift to turn around, but you can’t just keep sailing the Titanic on into successive icebergs. It sinks at some point, and I believe it is sinking.

“I think that the participation rates on NAPLAN actually show the parents voting with their feet. For all of those who hold their children back and they don’t participate, there must be very many who are on the verge of that, like myself, who feel uncomfortable, who do their very best to show their child it doesn’t matter, fully conscious of the fact that the child’s being told other things and being given other signals at school and elsewhere. I think that is an expression of the public’s mood on it.”

Jordana Hunter, education program director at the Grattan Institute, believes that while NAPLAN isn’t perfect, scrapping it altogether would be a big step backwards.

Hunter told Australian Teacher Magazine a sample-based test couldn’t provide the same value NAPLAN does, but added that the report raises important questions about teachers’ access to high quality formative assessment.

“For a national standardised assessment, I think it’s important that it is census based, it’s important that families and students have access to an independent perspective on their learning over time, so I think it really does need to be census-based for that to be achieved,” Hunter said.

“When we look at the classroom level, from a formative assessment perspective, it’s important for teachers to be able to exercise their own professional judgement about the types of assessments that will be most useful for them on a day-to-day basis to capture evidence of student learning and make decisions about how to deliver their instruction in response to that.”

Hunter said that NAPLAN also holds enormous value for policymakers.

“Like every other area of the economy, there’s pressure on education budgets and it’s important for decision makers to know how different areas of the education system are tracking so that they can make decisions about how to allocate resources in ways that can improve capacity where it’s needed most.

“Like all organisations, our schools will have different strengths and weaknesses and they’re likely to change over time, so as a school finds that there’s an area where they’ve been having some trouble producing the levels of student progress they might like to see, NAPLAN can provide them the opportunity to get more clarity about that, understand what the challenges might be, and look for support to improve outcomes over time.”

The issue, Hunter said, is that NAPLAN has sometimes been presented as something that it’s not.

“NAPLAN is not a diagnostic tool, it is not a particularly effective formative assessment, but that is not its purpose and that’s not really what it has been designed to do. I think part of the resistance to NAPLAN is the expectation that NAPLAN can be all things to all people when it really can’t.

“NAPLAN is not perfect. There are things about NAPLAN that we can improve, that we should be working to improve. And hopefully, if NAPLAN is a more effective adaptive test, when the wrinkles with delivering NAPLAN online are ironed out and when NAPLAN results return more quickly to schools, NAPLAN can be seen as a more valuable part of a broader assessment regime. And when teachers have access to richer, more diagnostic forms of formative assessment, I think there’ll be less pressure on NAPLAN to be all things for all people.”

Hunter said it’s important for teachers and parents to encourage students to keep NAPLAN in perspective.

“Most children actually cope really well with NAPLAN, and if children are expressing concerns about NAPLAN, I think it’s really important for the adults in their lives, be it parents or teachers, to reassure children that NAPLAN is just an opportunity to check in on their learning.

“NAPLAN shouldn’t be framed as a competition, where there’s a prize for the winner and there’s some sort of punishment for the loser. And it’s really important, I think, that parents and teachers do provide that reassurance to children.

“I’ve likened it to going to the dentist. Sitting NAPLAN, like going to the dentist, is probably not the thing on the calendar that we all look forward to the most, but it really is just an opportunity for the adults in the room to get a sense of how teachers and school leaders and policymakers and systems can best support them in their learning.

“I think that message of reassurance is really important, and it really is up to adults to make sure they don’t make NAPLAN a more unpleasant process than it has to be.”

 

(Source: EducationHQ.com)